Product Review: The Mission Belt

January 26, 2015 2 comments

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It’s impressive when a company can re-invent a basic product, and actually have their new approach reach beyond the label of total gimmick. Take the belt and belt buckle for example – l mean, since forever (actually only since the Bronze Age, says Wikipedia), anyone who has ever had a need to keep their pants from falling down has accepted that a belt strap wraps around your waist, heads through a buckle, and then is affixed with a prong securing itself in a hole on the belt’s opposite end. The belt buckle strays a little from this method, but is still conceptually the same. So it is, so it was, so it always will be, right?

Enter The Mission Belt Company. Mission Belt has, without a doubt, changed the belt game. For the better. Not only do they make a better belt than what we’re all used to, they’re helping make the world a better place too. So beat that, conventional belt makers.

muralThe major conceptual reinvention Mission Belt employs with their leather belts and buckles is a ratchet system, built into both the buckle and the leather strap. They’ve completely bypassed the standard holes and prong approach, instead giving you a completely different fastening experience. Conversely, Mission’s belt does away with the leather puncturing holes and replaces them with gear-like teeth on the underside of the strap. When this section hits the buckle after insertion, it’s met by the pawl on the backside of the connection point. The wearer simply slides the belt in as far as necessary, and the belt locks in place. When escape is necessary, freedom is only a release knob lift away. Readjustment requires only a push in on the strap – unlike the traditional belt that requires an entire unlatch and re-latch to get where you need to be. Don’t expect readjustment to be overly necessary though – unlike old style belts that can loosen over time through wear and tear, the Mission Belt stays locked in place all day unless you tell it otherwise.

Still need help with this new concept? Here’s a video walkthrough: 

Mission Belts are resizable too — here’s another video walkthrough on how to shorten the leather strap.

IMG_7524Further, you can (likely) get a buckle with your favorite team’s logo on it. 22 NHL teams are available, alongside squads from the NCAA and NBA. Each team has 2-4 pre-set leather color options, but if none of them strike your combo fancy, you can mix and match your buckle with one of the 17 leather colors the company offers. And if sports belts aren’t your thing, they have a whole line of other fashionable belts to peruse instead. A standard belt/leather combo set runs $54.95, but alternatively you can pick your own buckle for $34.95, and then pay $20 for leather of your choice, to get the combination you desire or to switch up another setup you already have in play. Sizes fit small to large, accommodating 32” to 42” waists within those standard sizes, or you can customize a belt to fit up to a 56” waist.

Beyond all that, “Mission” is not only the company’s name, it’s also part of their business plan. For every Mission Belt sold, $1 is donated to Kiva, a non-profit peer-to-peer “micro-lending” organization that helps provide opportunities to support economic development and entrepreneurship around the globe. To learn more about how Mission Belt’s team up with Kiva helps fight global hunger and poverty through micro-lending, read Mission’s statement on their practices here, visit Kiva’s website www.kiva.org, and visit Mission Belt’s Kiva lender profile here.

Additionally, find Mission on Facebook, TwitterInstagram, YouTube, and their website missionbelt.com.

Look good with Mission Belts, and feel good about looking so good too!

=========CONTEST=========

Wanna win your own Mission Belt? I am giving away a size medium (up to 35″ waist) LA Kings buckle with “Cool Grey” strap to the first commenter who can correctly answer the following question:

Wayne Gretzky finished his NHL career with 2,857 regular season points and 382 playoff points. What is the combined total of regular season AND playoff points he scored for the LA Kings?

The first person to leave the correct total in a comment will win! Good luck!

 

XP PSP s01e16: Jeff Jarrett, president/founder of Global Force Wrestling

December 30, 2014 Leave a comment

UntitledIt’s not everyday that you get to interview a legend from the world of pro wrestling. Have a listen episode 16 of the eXPat Pro Sports Podcast, as I talk with Jeff Jarrett, president of Global Force Wrestling, former WWE Intercontinental Champion, WCW Heavyweight Champion, NWA Heavyweight Champion, founder of TNA Wrestling, among other billings — we discuss GFW, their promotion of NJPW’s Jan 4th PPV event, “Wrestle Kingdom 9″, his wrestling career, WWE, Vince McMahon, concussions and guitar head shots, Jeff’s Christian faith, No Mercy 1999, Bash at the Beach 2000, David Arquette as WCW Champion, and more.
Download XP PSP on iTunes

2014 Jeju Cup Winter Classic

October 27, 2014 Leave a comment

Jeju Cup Winter Classic

Unwilling to be restricted to being just an annual summer event, the Jeju Cup will be contested for a second time this calendar year — this time at the 2014 Jeju Cup Winter Classic.

On December 7th, 2014 players of all skill levels and from all locales are invited to be part of a full day of street hockey action — to declare the second Jeju Cup champion, and to push towards our goal of raising 1,000,000 KRW (approxmiately $1000 CAD) for the Jeju Islanders Hockey Club.

As of now, all Jeju Islanders weekly games and events rely solely on donations and out of pocket payments to operate. As our team has grown to regular weekly games of over 20 participants each week, and tournaments with attendance many times that, so have our required expenditures increased. Currently, we need funding for:

  • The rental or construction of an equipment storage facility.
  • Current and future tournament/event costs.
  • Equipment:
    • new sticks as old ones break, and to accommodate our rising amount of players.
    • stick tape.
    • street hockey balls.
    • goalie equipment.
    • jerseys.
    • scoreboard.
    • equipment maintenance.
    • proper goal netting (currently our nets are lined with fishing netting).

To reach that goal, we’ll have mini-game prizes, silent auction items, t-shirts for sale, concessions, and our registration fee that gets you a full day of tournament games, and lunch.

If you’d like to be a part of the competition and the effort, fill out this registration form:

Once you’ve filled out the registration form COMPLETE YOUR REGISTRATION and secure your spot in the tournament by transferring 25,000 KRW via ATM  bank transfer to:

Jeju Bank 18-02-312272

You can also pay your registration fee online by clicking on this PayPal Pay Now button:

OR if you are a local you can pay me cash directly when I see you.

To get to the rink, get yourself to the Jeju City bus terminal on the 1132 highway. Head south a few blocks and fade a little east. It’s right beside the swimming pool in the Sports Complex. Here’s a map:

rink map

We are also actively seeking event sponsors who would like to have their company and/or product benefit from the exposure the Jeju Islanders and the Jeju Cup can offer them in our local community, and throughout the world, online. For sponsorship inquiries, please email davecunning09@shaw.ca

Visit the Jeju Islanders Facebook page by clicking here.

Read about the inaugural Jeju Cup street hockey tournament:

1) In the Jeju Weekly: http://www.jejuweekly.com/news/articleView.html?idxno=4231

2) On this blog:  https://davecunning.wordpress.com/2014/07/25/jeju-cup-scores-big-puts-hockey-on-the-map-in-jeju-south-korea/

3) in KelownaNow.com: http://www.kelownanow.com/columns/sports/news/Sports/14/07/19/Okanagan_Hockey_Player_Brings_Canada_s_Sport_to_South_Korea

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See you at the rink!

-Dave Cunning

President & GM,  Jeju Islanders Hockey Club

 

New AllSportsMarket Free App allows you to trade pro sports teams like stocks

October 23, 2014 Leave a comment

NHL hockey legend, Bernie Nicholls, and Hollywood stuntman and filmmaker, Ace Underhill have teamed up to build the World’s First Sports Stock Market. The duo’s brainchild, the All Sports Market App (ASM), is a sports stock market App where fans can buy and sell shares in their favorite NHL, NBA, and NFL teams.

After each game, the winning teams payout dividends to their shareholders (note: the app is free, and no real money is involved). Players can accumulate SportsFolio Points to exchange for ASM Dollars (the in-app currency), which can then be used to buy real sports memorabilia and other sports products from the Rewards Store (opens in or before January 2015, though points are collectible now). The program parallels the real stock market, except that ASM uses sports teams from leagues that people actually know, rather than unfamiliar businesses listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

ASM is free to download, free to play, and offers sports fans an alternative to “gambling”, instead focusing on “investing”. It’s more of a “reality sports” product, rather than a “fantasy sports” product.

“As a player, I always loved the fans and appreciated them,” Nicholls said. “I’ve tried to give back as much as I can. All Sports Market is taking it to the next level by opening up a whole new world of fun and opportunity for sports fans everywhere. It’s simple. You buy and sell teams like stocks on the stock market. When they win, you win!”

“ASM is a quantum leap beyond fantasy sports,” Underhill remarked further. “We know fans love consuming all the data they can find, following their players and bragging about them, but something is missing… a REAL connection to their favorite teams. We enable fans to own the game.”

The app, and its unique combination of founding talent, has drawn the attention of comedian Christopher Titus, film and television star Zack Ward, triple Grammy winner Ben Moody, Snoop Dogg, and many other celebrities and athletes who are participating in the worldwide launch over social media.

By contributing to and supporting the Snoop Youth Football League (SYFL), ASM seeks to help end financial illiteracy and create new opportunities for kids to learn finance through sports. The SYFL’s classroom setting and focus on education in addition to athletics makes a partnership with the sports stock trader a logical evolution.

“I love the kids and I always have,” said Nicholls. “I love the youth camps and programs. Having Snoop on board is just awesome. I know we’ll do great things together.”

“The children are our future,” Underhill continued in his manifesto on the sports trading movement. “As cliche as that sounds, it’s true. Financial illiteracy in this country, and the world, represses people’s abilities to overcome the day-to-day challenges of earning and handling money, as well as planning for their future. What if you could focus all that sports knowledge and passion into a positive change for your personal future?”

Upon reading Underhill’s statement, Snoop replied, “Run with it everywhere.”

20141023_151123000_iOS

Full disclosure: I owned 50 shares in the LA Kings at the time of this picture.

ASM is a great way to really get involved with your favorite teams, giving players a feeling of novelty and involvement not normally gleaned from other sports products. It gives the fans a sense of empowerment both through the ownership of a team ‘share’, and the confidence that goes with having learned about stock trading, without having to open a text book.

To find out more about the AllSportsMarket App, visit ASM’s website: http://ASMFree.com/; Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/asmfreeapp; and Twitter feed: http://www.twitter.com/ASMFreeApp

You can download ASM for free on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/kr/app/asm-free!-allsportsmarket/id905746665?l=en&mt=8

Read more about ASM online:

1) Yahoo! Finance: www.finance.yahoo.com/news/hollywood-stuntman-hockey-legend-build-184700872.html

2) Reuters: www.reuters.com/article/2014/10/16/ca-allsports-snoopdog-idUSnPn5gC6sQ+89+PRN20141016

3) The Hockey Writers: http://thehockeywriters.com/all-sports-stock-market-ex-nhler-bernie-nicholls-explains/

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AllSportsMarket (ASM) is operated by The New Sports Economy Institute, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization established to teach finance through sports. Ace Underhill is the sole technical architect with over 15 years experience working in movies, television, and music videos with such luminaries as Snoop Dogg, Coldplay, Rihanna, Foo Fighters, and other top artists worldwide. Bernie Nicholls is ASM’s spokesman and sports industry liaison. Bernie was an explosive scorer who accumulated over 1,200 career points while playing for six NHL teams. Recently, Bernie helped coach the L.A. Kings to their first Stanley Cup in 47 years.

The Snoop Youth Football League is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization founded to provide the opportunity for inner-city children to participate in youth football and cheer. The SYFL serves children between the ages of five and thirteen, teaching them the values of teamwork, good sportsmanship, discipline, and self-respect, while also stressing the importance of academics. Visit: http://snoopyfl.net/

XP PSP s01e15: Former Dallas Cowboys Cheerleader, Candice Carr interview

October 13, 2014 Leave a comment

166601_10150402147215646_2118447_nIn episode 15 of XP PSP, Harold Dale and I start out the show with a discussion of the legal trouble that NFL players have found themselves in this season and whether or not it’s actually hurting the league at all, then former Dallas Cowboys cheerleader Candice Carr calls in to talk about her cheerleading career for arguably the world’s most popular and recognized cheer squads, as well as to give her take on the lawsuits brought against NFL teams recently by the cheerleaders of the Buffalo Bills, Cincinnati Bengals, and Oakland Raiders.

Candice is now the owner of Social Photo Booths in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Be sure to check them out on FacebookTwitterInstagram, and their website socialphotobooths.com.

Follow host Dave Cunning and XP PSP on Twitter too!
Download XP PSP on iTunes

 

 

The NHL’s highest & lowest ticket prices; conference realignment’s alleged slant in West’s favor

October 8, 2014 Leave a comment

Thinking about attending an NHL game or two this season? The leading resale ticket market aggregator/data source, TiqIQ ( www.tiqiq.com ) has got your budgeting covered as they’ve gathered ticket price info from the entire NHL to show you what’s affordable, what’s not, and everything in between. Here’s what they found out:

  • The average price for an NHL ticket is currently $162.96, which is 1.29% higher than the price this time last year ($160.89)
  • We have seen over the past several years, prices from now till end of season tend to drop anywhere between 18%-29%
  • Below are the Top 5 teams with the most expensive tickets this season:
    • Leafs: $373.50
    • Canucks: $282.58
    • Blackhawks: $275.65
    • Oilers: $259.83
    • Flames: $241.18
  • The team with the lowest average price currently are the Tampa Bay Lightning at $77.21
  • The team with the biggest % increase from last season to this season is the Ducks at 75.95% ($55.23 to $95.51) and the Jets had biggest decrease at -24.16% ($206.53 to $156.64)
  • Below are a few other notable teams and their change in price from last year:
    • Rangers: -6.62% ($233.42 to $217.97)
    • Kings: +5.74% ($125.73 to $132.95)
    • Blackhawks: -13.03% ($316.94 to $275.65)
    • Islanders: +41.17% ($89.17 to $125.88)
    • Avalanche: +17.92% ($87.11 to $102.72)
To view an online spreadsheet with all the ticket data for every team in the NHL for this season and last season as well, click here (tip: you’ll need Microsoft Excel to view it) .
 Be sure to visit www.tiqiq.com for more great data like this!
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With teams from the Western Conference winning 60% of the Stanley Cup championships since the league split into Eastern and Western Conferences in 1994, does the NHL’s most recent alignment structure disadvantage Eastern Conference teams? New statistical research says Yes!

haha, suckers!

Last year, the NHL realigned its conferences and divisions. The Eastern Conference now has 16 teams, while the Western Conference has only 14. Since there still are eight playoff spots in both conferences, teams in the West have a 57% probability of making the playoffs compared to just 50% for East teams.

This imbalance raises the question of how much more difficult it will be to make the playoffs in the East. In other words: How many more points—on average—will the East’s 8th seed team need to earn than the West’s 8th seed team to make the playoffs? If this difference—called the “conference gap”—is zero, we can conclude no team is facing an unfair advantage to getting into the playoffs. If the conference gap is not zero, we can question whether the realignment is fair.

To quantify this potential gap, Stephen Pettigrew, author of the Rink Stats blog (http://rinkstats.com/), estimated the impact of realignment using a Monte Carlo simulation of the new alignment’s scheduling matrix over 10,000 simulated NHL seasons (Monte Carlo methods are a common tool for statistical researchers to simulate games and seasons in hockey and other sports).

Pettigrew’s analysis reveals that when team talent is roughly distributed evenly between the two conferences, it will require 2.74 more points on average to make the playoffs in the East than in the West. So, on average, an Eastern Conference playoff-hopeful team will need to win one or two more games than a Western Conference playoff-hopeful team.

This finding has far-reaching competitive and financial implications for the NHL. For owners, it means imbalances in the revenue earned from home playoff games. Western Conference teams will make the playoffs at higher rates than Eastern Conference teams, resulting in at least two extra games of ticket and concession sales. For players, it means playing for a Western Conference team gives them a better chance of winning the Stanley Cup in any given year since simply making it to the playoffs gives them a chance to win it all. For fans of Eastern Conference teams, it means a higher probability their season will end too soon and less of a chance that in any given year his or her team will win the Stanley Cup.

Pettigrew’s analysis is reported in the September 2014 issue of the Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports (http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jqas), a publication of the American Statistical Association (www.amstat.org).

Star Factory Fitness interview

September 24, 2014 Leave a comment

Hi folks! I was recently interviewed by Conor Doherty of Star Factory Fitness. We talked about my hockey career, my training career, and hockey training in general. The interview originally posted on elitehockeypower.com on September 18, 2014. Have a read either there, or below! Also, be sure to visit starfactoryfitness.com and elitehockeypower.com for some great hockey training and fitness tips. Both sites are also on Twitter @sfactoryfitness and @ehockeypower.

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Interview with Former Pro Hockey Player Dave Cunning

Playing pro hockey is something that all motivated hockey players strive for.  Not everyone will reach that level, but having a former pro hockey player give you advice never hurts.  So I’m very pleased to have Dave Cunning share with you some of the things he learned and experienced along the way to becoming a pro hockey player and what it takes to play at that level.


1. Hey David, Nice to have you on the site.  I’m interested, along with other readers, what sports you played growing up?

I started playing hockey and soccer when I was five years old, but soccer eventually gave way to baseball. I used to ski when I was a kid too, but I transitioned to snowboarding when I got older, and learned to wakeboard after that. My family plays a lot of badminton, so I picked that up, along with golf. I played volleyball and basketball in elementary and high school. I recall trying archery at one point too. I was obviously pretty deep into sports. Hockey eventually won out over them all, though I still participate in most of the others from time to time.

2. I hear you’ve played a bit of pro hockey. Tell us a bit about your hockey career.

Getting to play in the pro ranks was a dream come true that I worked very hard for a lot of years to accomplish. It took me 17 years to rise through minor, junior, and college hockey before I had the opportunity to fly across the world to Europe and play professionally. Scoring a goal in my first game as a pro made every second of that struggle worth it. It was an amazing feeling to play at that level, and remains one of my greatest accomplishments. A lot of guys played a lot longer and had a lot more lucrative careers than I did, but I cherish the time that I had to live out my dream and play at that level. Hockey allowed me to travel through four countries to play, and to meet some of the best friends that I have, so I am very thankful for the time I had to play the game.

3. Did you have a strength and conditioning coach with any of the junior or pro teams you played with?

I remember having strength and conditioning coaches with my junior team (Creston Thundercats of the KIJHL) and my college team (Briecrest College of the ACAC), but oddly not with my pro team in France (Lyon HC). They were helpful to have around, usually doing group sessions with our entire team. I know a lot of guys were like me and didn’t utilize them as much as we probably should have. A lot of the exercises I picked up were from teammates sharing parts of their training routines with me, which I cherry picked from to help form my own approach to training. If I’d had the money to hire one of them I probably would have, but there isn’t a lot of money in junior and college hockey – at least not where I was and when I was there.

4. If so, tell us a bit about the programs that those coaches took you through.

Again, I didn’t get the most out of the strength coaches that were around, but the gist of what they were trying to teach us as a group was to train specifically for our sport, and to train the muscles and movements that hockey players use in the game. There was a lot of power and quickness prescribed to be used in each motion. They were trying to get us away from just general bodybuilding exercises – though there were always a few guys who insisted on coming in to just train chest and biceps, no matter what they were told to the contrary. A lot of the advice that was doled out to us over a few sessions at the beginning of the season, then we were on our own to carry it out that year, save for a few sporadic check-ups here and there. We had pre-season and mid-season fitness testing too. It’s important to remember that a hockey season is rather grueling physically, so our in-season workouts were nowhere near as intense as they were in the off-season. It was maintenance more than anything.

former pro hockey player

5. Were there any differences between junior and pro strength coaches, in terms of their programming and beliefs about strength training?

I think my junior and college strength coaches were very much of the same school of thought, though they all had different sports backgrounds. They all knew it was an important component for an athlete though. What I think might have been the difference between training between amateur and pro was the geography and perhaps the language barrier. In Lyon we had a gym at the rink, but it was pretty basic. Most of the times I would go in there to train, I would be the only one. The guys could have been going somewhere else to workout that I didn’t know of, but I didn’t have a strong enough level of French to find out where that was if that was what was happening. I think in Canada, you get spoiled a little as hockey players because our whole country is so in love with hockey and the guys and girls who play it have a plethora of options in front of them to take advantage of to get better at it. You can find a trainer at a gym to train you specifically for hockey at a gym, or you can find a hockey school in your town to improve your gameplay. Not every country in the world has that high of a regard for hockey, so those options aren’t as readily available, as it appeared to be where I was. Surely other nations who embrace the game like Canada does are different though.

6. What made you want to become a strength and conditioning coach?

When I realized that my playing days were done, I knew I wanted to stay involved in the game, and I had to think about which capacity would be the best fit for me to do so. Remembering back to when I was playing, I loved working out in the summers with a buddy of mine – we pushed each other as hard as we could to get stronger, faster, and better so that we could keep going farther in the game. I loved being motivated by a like-minded person, and I loved being that same thing to someone else. It paid off for us both, as we both eventually become pros (though he got an NHL tryout, so he got farther along than I did). I saw becoming a strength coach as an opportunity to help other players see what it takes to get where they want to go, and help be one part of their preparation and motivation to go as far as they could in the game. It’s been awesome to watch the players I’ve trained get noticeably stronger and quicker, and have a bigger impact on their team than before.

7. What types of courses or certifications did you take to become a strength coach?

I graduated through the BCRPA Personal Trainer certification program.

8. What level of hockey players do you train at the moment?

I’m currently overseas in Korea teaching English, so I am only training general fitness clients on the side at the moment. But while I was still in Canada, I was regularly training WHL, BCHL, and KIJHL players, and plan to do so again when I return home.

9. Take us through what a workout would look like during the season and the off-season.

Off-season workouts are a lot more physical than in-season ones, but that is for a reason. You aren’t skating everyday and playing every weekend in the summer, nor are you battling fatigue and injuries, so you have to balance the two training seasons appropriately. The off-season’s for building strength, size, quickness, stamina, power, mobility, and range of motion, while in-season training is primarily about maintaining those attributes. Off-season workouts see you lift a lot of weight, perform a lot of sets, and execute each motion with a lot of a lot of power to help build the specific major and minor muscle groups that hockey players use most during the game. There are a lot of all-out sprints and related exercises to get your feet moving as quick as they ever have, in hopes of that translating into you becoming a quicker skater during the season. While you work out through hockey season, you perform a lot of the same exercises and motions, but you do it with an approach that doesn’t leave you sore, tired, or otherwise not in optimal condition when it comes to game time. Every level of hockey has a different length of season, and you have to be ready for each game whether it’s the first, last, or somewhere mid-season. Usually in-season workouts have guys scaling back their sets and reps, and not pushing their limits, though they do their best to maintain the benchmarks they’ve already set, and not regress in any categories.

10. What sets apart the players that really get great results compared to those that get average results from training?

It’s simply the dedication to get the work done, and to use your time wisely. In junior hockey and pro hockey, you have a lot more extra time in your day, so there are less excuses to miss workouts – though some guys always find a way. In college hockey, you have to balance student life, class schedules, and everything else, so it’s tougher to find the time, and it’s really easy to pass on trips to the gym. It becomes about prioritizing your time to do it, no matter what your current lifestyle allows. The guys who make that time to get better are almost always the guys who have the most success.

11. When you played pro hockey, was there a player(s) that really stood out in the weight room compared to others?

There were always two or three guys on every team I played for that were standouts in the gym, and had the bodies to show for it. I saw each one of them put in the time and effort to get themselves there. One guy in particular was Bobby Leavins – he was a New York Islanders draft pick, and had played a season of minor pro, so to have him on our college team as our captain was huge for us. He brought his dedication to off-ice training to our team, and always made time to get in the gym. Our school’s gym was located in the basketball/volleyball gymnasium, and somehow Bobby had managed to get himself a gym key so he could workout even when the gym was closed. One time during a school event, the gym was packed with students, including our team, all focused on whatever event was taking place in the gymnasium that night. Conspicuously, Bobby was nowhere to be found – until further inspection revealed that he had made his made his way into the gym with his key, kept the main lights off and smuggled in a desk lamp, and was basically working out in the dark, undetected until I found him. Despite playing as a left-winger as a pro, Bobby moved back to defense for our team, and still finished second in team scoring. The guy was definitely doing something right, and I know his commitment to training had something to do with it.

12. If you could give hockey players that want to start an off-ice training program any advice, what would it be?

My advice would be to do it! A lot of guys unfortunately don’t get past the stage of talking about it and saying they want to start doing it. Whether you hire a trainer, find a like-minded gym buddy, or research and put together your own program, just get to it. Of course I recommend hiring a professional over all the other options – certified trainers are educated to make your training routines sport specific, efficient, and optimized to make you the best you can be, when you need to be. Of course, trainers are an investment, and some players think that they know enough and don’t need them. While some players have the luxury on relying on natural talent to ascend in the sport, most guys have to work for everything they get. Whether you can afford to hire a trainer or not really is a question of whether you can afford to be less prepared than you could be if you did. Personally, after becoming a trainer and learning the approaches and methodologies I know now, and after seeing how many NHLers hire trainers and seeing how hard they work in the summer, part of me wishes I had made that investment when I was still playing. Competition for spots on teams at every level is so intense these days – players have to find a way to stand out from the crowd to get one of those open spots on a roster. If off-ice training is the thing that helps you catch a scout or coach’s eye in training camp, there’s no question it’s worth the investment. Never be satisfied with where you’re at – in hockey there’s always someone younger, bigger, and better that wants to be where you are, so you’ve got to do what it takes to keep your place, or be the one that takes someone else’s spot.

You can find out more about David and his work at:

His Websites: davecunning.wordpress.com and cunningathletics.wordpress.com

Twitter: @davecunning and @CunningAthletix

Podcast: http://xppsp.podbean.com

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