Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Warrior hockey’

XP PSP s01e17: Warrior Hockey brand manager, Keith Perera

February 1, 2015 Leave a comment

Perera1Warrior Hockey’s Brand Manager, Keith Perera, calls in for episode 17 to talk about Warrior’s generous equipment donation to the Jeju Islanders Hockey Club in Jeju, South Korea last year, the evolution and maturing of Warrior’s products, the difference between marketing to hockey and lacrosse players, the role social media plays in product sales and brand loyalty, the hockey equipment business, Warrior’s presence in the NHL and other hockey leagues, what guys like Dustin Byfuglien and Ryan Smyth request from them, why the Oilers and Sabres are so bad and how to fix them, and a whole bunch more.

Follow Warrior Hockey on TwitterFacebookTumblr, and Instagram.
Download XP PSP on iTunes

Hockey’s alive and well in Jeju, South Korea. Here’s another reason why.

May 24, 2014 Leave a comment

Well yesterday was amazing.

It was then that I told you all about a ridiculously generous donation that Warrior Hockey made to us in Jeju, South Korea to help grow hockey on our island. As I post this the next day, that afore mentioned post has been viewed over 25,000 times in more than 20 countries, and the meter’s still running. That’s 15,000 more times than my second highest viewed post — which has had a year and a half’s head start on it. That first day total was received more views than I had in 2009, 2010, and 2013, respectively. On Twitter it got more than 20 retweets and favorites, on Facebook it got 120+ likes, 20+ comments and shares, and on Reddit Hockey, it had around 2000 up votes, and got over 300 comments — many pledging to purchase Warrior products in the future, or mentioning they already have because of the story. Truly, there is no better way to Warrior them gratitude than by having a whole bunch of people boost their business. So endless thanks to all who read, commented, shared, have and/or will pick up some Warrior gear to help me say thanks. Beyond that, the post got mentioned by Sports Illustrated, Puck Daddy, and some other major hockey media outlets. Like I said, amazing. That was one of those moments where you realize how cool the internet can be.

But as cool as that all was, I’d be remised not to mention another benefactor who has assisted hockey in Jeju too. Canadian Ball Hockey Korea (CBHK), a group based in Seoul, also made an extremely generous donation to us, shipping us a pile of their experienced sticks, balls, and nearly two full sets of seasoned goalie equipment. It is because of this that we no longer have to share sticks and play posts. One of our awesome Jeju teammates hauled bags worth of stuff from Busan (where CBHK bused it to from Seoul) via airplane to Jeju, and we’ve had no shortage of players, goalie volunteers, or people with cars willing to help haul the gear to the rink and back yet.

CBHK gear

I’ve played on a lot of teams in my time, and this is unquestionably one of the most cool and selfless. The fraternity of hockey players is truly a worldwide phenomenon — whether it’s with people in your own town, or with people on the other side of the world that you’ve never met, hockey players from all backgrounds seem to want to help the game grow when they have the opportunity to make it happen.

So another big thanks, this time to our teammates from CBHK in Seoul for their help in kick-starting hockey on Jeju Island, South Korea. If any of you readers find yourselves in Seoul, be sure to get in touch with them and try to get yourselves in a game sometime.

And of course, if any of you ever  find yourselves in Jeju, the same offer stands for you to come and find us to play a little puck!

hockey

 


Warrior is the best hockey company out there. Here’s why.

May 21, 2014 12 comments

Playing hockey all your life then moving to an island in Korea that is void of the sport certainly has it’s challenges. But where there’s a will there’s a way, and I need to take this blog post to recognize Warrior Hockey as someone who has become the way for me and others in my community.

When I moved to Jeju, South Korea in 2012, there was literally zero hockey here. No one playing any version of it, and no one that I knew yet that even watched it or kept up with a team. I essentially resigned to the notion that I may not see or play hockey again until I returned home to Canada, eventually.

Slowly, hockey people began to emerge. As we learned of each other’s presence, we began to gather. Sometimes to watch, sometimes to discuss, and eventually to start playing. A Facebook group was started. An inline hockey rink, shop, and kids inline program was discovered. A half built ice rink at Branksome Hall Asia was uncovered as well. Cheap sticks were bought from China, and a ball was sent from Canada. Interest incubated, and before long, we had street hockey games going. Low numbers, but high level enjoyment. I began to play and coach again. Hockey began to hatch around these parts. It became apparent to me that hockey could really happen here, if we gave it a good push in the right direction.

But a major hurdle was the equipment. For a casual hockey tire-kicker, buying a hockey stick for $40-50 in order to try out the sport for the first time was just not feasible. A small handful of us had bit the bullet and bought some, but we did not have the resources to clear the equipment hurdle and provide everyone with sticks in hopes of spurring the interest of  island inhabitants to give our sport a chance.

That is, until Warrior came along.

Though I was constantly sending out S.O.S. messages to hockey companies like Bauer, CCM/Reebok, Easton, and others for months prior, it was Warrior — and only Warrior — that not only sent me a response, but appeared willing to assist our cause. After explaining my intentions to Warrior brand manager Keith Perera on Twitter in 140 characters or less, I was put in contact with Daniel Park, the CEO of Warrior Korea. Mr. Park contacted me via email and expressed interest in visiting our community to assess the state of hockey and whether Warrior could be of assistance to its growth in Jeju.

After flying down and visiting for a day of touring our blossoming hockey grounds, it was not long after that my living room was transformed into this:

Unable to form complete sentences for most of the day, I think I mentioned something about it being like Christmas morning a whole bunch of times.

Without giving you an entire list of inventory, in short, Warrior straight up donated us sticks, helmets, gloves, pads, and bags to help hockey grow and flourish in Jeju, South Korea. It was nothing short of amazing. Warrior has helped us put hockey sticks in the hands of new players that otherwise would not have even tried the game.

So where do we go from here? Well, for starters, if you live in Jeju, come play hockey with us. Join our Facebook group, it’s regularly updated with game times and locations. If you have, or can acquire inline skates, join our inline hockey team. If you have kids in Jeju that want to learn how to play hockey, join the Jeju Inline Academy (email: 6774rlacjfqo@hanmail.com), where I coach. And for goodness sakes, the next time you’re in the market for hockey equipment, please consider Warrior first. Visit warrior.com and/or your local hockey shop and pick up whatever you need (if you’re in Kelowna, Canada, I recommend Chevy’s Source For Sports). They make everything you need, short of skates, and it’s all solid gear. If it works for the likes of Zdeno Chara, Henrik Zetterberg, Jonathan Quick, and other bonafide NHL stars, it’ll work for you too. Your support of them will go a long way in helping me say thanks to a company that cared enough to support us.

If you’re anywhere in Korea and want to buy Warrior gear, shoot Daniel Park and email at ryoma67@naver.com

Thank you Warrior!

JIA

UPDATE: This post was mentioned by Sports Illustrated in a post of theirs on May 22nd, 2014.

%d bloggers like this: