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Posts Tagged ‘Korea’

2nd Annual Jeju Cup Winter Classic ball hockey tournament registration form

December 3, 2015 Leave a comment

cover shot
The highly anticipated, fiercely contested 2nd Annual Jeju Cup Winter Classic Ball Hockey Tournament will be held on Saturday December 13th at the Jeju City inline rink. Players of all skill levels are invited to participate in this one full day of ball hockey action — the fourth tournament the Jeju Islanders Hockey Club has hosted. Each team will battle it out for the chance of having their names engraved on the prestigious Jeju Cup!

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/912667562141522/

Help us raise funds for the Jeju Islanders Hockey Club so we can grow the sport of hockey in Jeju, and help support worthy charitable causes. As of now, all Jeju Islanders weekly games and events rely solely on donations and out of pocket payments to operate. As our team has grown to regular weekly games of over 20 participants each week, and tournaments with attendance many times that, so have our required expenditures increased. Currently, we need funding for:

Jeju Cup Winter Classic 2015-The rental or construction of an equipment storage facility (currently we rely on team volunteers to store and hustle the gear each week).
-Current and future tournament/event costs.
-support of local kids hockey programs.
-Equipment:
-new sticks as old ones break, and to accommodate our rising amount of players.
-stick tape.
-street hockey balls.
-goalie equipment.
-jerseys.
-scoreboard.
-equipment maintenance.

To reach our financial goals, we’ll have mini-game prizes, raffle items, t-shirts, hats, and toques for sale, concessions, and our registration fee that gets you a full day of tournament games, and lunch.

We are actively seeking players, volunteers, and sponsors to make this effort a success.

If you’d like to be a part of the competition and the effort, fill out this registration form: ********

Once you’ve filled out the registration form, COMPLETE YOUR REGISTRATION and secure your spot in the tournament by transferring 30,000 KRW via ATM bank transfer to:

Bank: ShinHan

Acct Holder: Allan Moore

Acct #:  110-396-549650

To get to the rink, get yourself to the Jeju City bus terminal on the 1132 highway. Head south a few blocks and fade a little east. It’s right beside the swimming pool in the Sports Complex. Here’s a map link: https://www.facebook.com/groups/jeju.island.hockey/files/

rink map

Bring your own stick if you have one, but if not, we have plenty of extras for you to borrow.

We’ll divide up our players into an even number of teams via draft at The Bar in Jeju City (we will sort and balance the teams according to skill level, don’t worry) to keep things even and fun. 5 on 5, with goalies!

Goalie gear and hockey sticks are provided.

If you can’t play, feel free to come by as a spectator.

Here’s some press of our previous tournaments:

Inaugural Jeju Cup: http://www.jejuweekly.com/news/articleView.html?idxno=4231
Inaugural Jeju Cup Winter Classic: http://www.jejuweekly.com/news/articleView.html?idxno=4518
Winter Classic semi-final shootout (video):

See you at the rink!

jeju islanders

 

 

-Jeju Islanders Hockey Club

2015 Jeju Cup Summer Classic registration form

May 11, 2015 Leave a comment

cover shot
The highly anticipated, fiercely contested 2nd Annual Jeju Cup Summer Classic Ball Hockey Tournament will be held on Saturday May 30th at the Jeju inline rink. Players of all skill levels are invited to participate in this one full day of ball hockey action — the third tournament the Jeju Islanders Hockey Club has hosted. Each team will battle it out for the chance of claiming the prestigious Jeju Cup!

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1109028419112248/

Help us reach our goal of raising 1,000,000 KRW for the Jeju Islanders Hockey Club. As of now, all Jeju Islanders weekly games and events rely solely on donations and out of pocket payments to operate. As our team has grown to regular weekly games of over 20 participants each week, and tournaments with attendance many times that, so have our required expenditures increased. Currently, we need funding for:

Summer Classic-The rental or construction of an equipment storage facility (currently we rely on team volunteers to store and hustle the gear each week).
-Current and future tournament/event costs.
-support of local kids hockey programs.
-Equipment:
-new sticks as old ones break, and to accommodate our rising amount of players.
-stick tape.
-street hockey balls.
-goalie equipment.
-jerseys.
-scoreboard.
-equipment maintenance.

To reach that goal, we’ll have mini-game prizes, raffle items, t-shirts and hats for sale, concessions, and our registration fee that gets you a full day of tournament games, and lunch.

We are actively seeking players, volunteers, and sponsors to make this effort a success.

If you’d like to be a part of the competition and the effort, fill out this registration form: ********

Once you’ve filled out the registration form, COMPLETE YOUR REGISTRATION and secure your spot in the tournament by transferring 25,000 KRW via ATM bank transfer to:
Bank: Nong Hyeop (NH)

Acct Holder: Sachin Mahajan

Acct #: 351-0405-4267-93

To get to the rink, get yourself to the Jeju City bus terminal on the 1132 highway. Head south a few blocks and fade a little east. It’s right beside the swimming pool in the Sports Complex. Here’s a map link:https://www.facebook.com/groups/jeju.island.hockey/238769609654940/

rink map

Bring your own stick if you have one, but if not, we have plenty of extras for you to borrow.

We’ll divide up our players into 6 teams “hat tournament style” (we will sort and balance the teams according to skill level) to keep things even and fun. 5 on 5, with goalies!

Goalie gear and hockey sticks are provided.

If you can’t play, feel free to come by as a spectator.

Here’s some press of our previous tournaments:

Inaugural Jeju Cup: http://www.jejuweekly.com/news/articleView.html?idxno=4231
Inaugural Jeju Cup Winter Classic: http://www.jejuweekly.com/news/articleView.html?idxno=4518
Winter Classic semi-final shootout (video):

See you at the rink!

-Jeju Islanders Hockey Club

XP PSP Podcast episodes 18-20

May 4, 2015 Leave a comment

To catch up on the latest 3 episodes of XP PSP: the eXPat Pro Sports Podcast that I fell behind on posting, have a look at the episode summaries and links below for episodes 18-20 — and take a listen while you’re at it!

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Episode 18 – Guest: Bernie Nicholls, 19 season NHL veteran, 3 time all-star.

BernieASMBernie and I discussed the All Sports Market Free App (the new sports stock market app Bernie is helping develop and promote), the world of sports gambling and what sports are easiest/most difficult to fix, the LA Kings waiving Mike Richards and whether we will see him in the NHL again, Bernie’s thoughts on the Slava Voynov legal situation, who the Kings should trade for prior to the NHL trade deadline to hopefully improve their chances of making the playoffs, why he engages social media more so than many older generation athletes, whether he wants to resume coaching in the NHL again, and a whole bunch more.

Link: http://xppsp.podbean.com/e/xp-psp-e18-bernie-nicholls-returns/

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/xp-psp-e18/id643817929

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Episode 19 – Guest: Jim Paek, first Korean born hockey player to both play in the NHL, and win the Stanley Cup. Current head coach for the South Korean national hockey team.

jimpaekpicJim and I spoke about how he’s perceived in Korea’s hockey community and his desire to improve hockey in his home nation, the freedom he has to make team decisions, his Korean skills, the language barrier, and how he works through communication issues on the team, the use of foreign born naturalized players to better South Korea’s chances and the pros and cons of that approach, the pressure and expectations for the national team that his resume brings, how the team can compete against the world’s best nations in 2018 while currently ranked two divisions down from their level and the fairness of them being in the tournament, how hard it was to make it to the NHL as a Korean and how he got there, playing with Mario Lemieux and Wayne Gretzky, playing under Scotty Bowman and working with Mike Babcock, what he learned from them, returning to the NHL as a coach, juggling being a husband and parent while being continents away from his family, and he makes a verbal commitment to help hockey in Jeju continue to grow!

Link: http://xppsp.podbean.com/e/xp-psp-e19-jim-paek/

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/xp-psp-e19/id643817929

==============

Episode 20 – Guest: Aleksandar Jovanović, defender for Jeju United FC (K-League soccer in Korea).

AleksAleks and I discuss him playing on a team where virtually no one else speaks English and other cultural challenges of living/playing in Korea, the performance expectations placed upon import players, how the K-League stacks up against other pro soccer leagues, how many languages he speaks, Jeju United’s recent coaching change and what they need to do to become a Asian Cup qualifying team this season, his goals and aspirations for the team and himself this year, and lots more.

Link: http://xppsp.podbean.com/e/xp-psp-e20-aleksandar-jovanovic-jeju-united-fc-defender/

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/xp-psp-e20/id643817929

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Podcast homepage: http://xppsp.podbean.com/

Download XP PSP on iTunes

Inaugural Jeju Cup charity street hockey tournament!

June 28, 2014 Leave a comment

Jeju Island’s first street hockey tournament (that I know of) is going down.

On July 13, 2014 players of all skill levels from all locales are invited to be part of a full day of street hockey action — to declare a Jeju Cup champion, and to push towards the goal of raising 1,000,000 KRW (approxmiately $1000 CAD) in July 2014 to be put towards buying the Jeju Inline Academy (JIA) their first set of goalie equipment.

To reach that goal, we’ll have mini-game prizes, silent auction items, t-shirts for sale, concessions, and our registration fee that gets you a full day of tournament games, and lunch. Or you can just straight up donate by clicking on this PayPal Donate button:

If you’d like to be a part of the competition and the effort, fill out this registration form:

TO COMPLETE YOUR REGISTRATION and secure your spot in the tournament, please transfer 20,000 KRW via bank transfer at an ATM to:

Jeju Bank 18-02-312272

OR pay through the above PayPal donation link, or pay me cash directly when I see you.

To get to the rink, get yourself to the Jeju City bus terminal on the 1132 highway. Head south a few blocks and fade a little east. It’s right beside the swimming pool in the Sports Complex. Here’s a map:

rink map

Here’s a look at the one of the shirts we’ll be selling at the event:

jeju islanders shirt

This and other hockey themed shirts are available to order through my Etsy Store, and all proceeds on them in the month of July 2014 will go towards meeting our goal.

Hope to see you at the rink!

 

 

Self Promotion Is So Much Easier When Others Do It For You….

August 24, 2012 1 comment

In this little adventure of a writing career I’ve forayed into over the last couple of years, I’ve had a lot of fun talking to all sorts of interesting people and writing interviews and features for various outlets. It didn’t really occur to me that anyone would ever be interested in turning the microphone around towards my face to record what I was saying, but that’s exactly what the Jeju Weekly did recently, when I sat down with Darryl Coote for my first formal interview. It appears in the August edition of their printed paper, and is available online. And below, for your reading pleasure.

Also, I was recently a guest of Thomas Holzerman on The Wrestling Podcast, from the makers of The Wrestling Blog. I talked about WWE-related stuff for a long time, and even got a little hockey talk in at the end. If that sounds like your cup of tea, click right here to listen, or you can click here to listen/download the show on iTunes

Enjoy the SDC smorgasbord!

-SDC

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Writing and hockey, passion and practice

Dave Cunning, a teacher and freelancer, is likely Jeju’s only former pro hockey player

Friday, August 17, 2012, 09:46:07  Darryl Coote  darrylcoote@jejuweekly.com

I met Dave Cunning a couple weeks back. He came to The Weekly’s office looking to write about sports.

Usually I meet people about town and ask them if they want to write for us. But with Dave, he was one of the few who actually came to me.

Soon after, I learned that Dave and I have some things in common. We’re both Canadian, we both write for newspapers, and we both played hockey — though, impressively, Dave played professionally.

▲ Dave Cunning. Photo by Darryl Coote

In early August I sat down with Dave over a couple of beers to talk shop.

“Well, if you want to get technical,” Dave said, “I started writing in college. I mean it was something that everybody does. You’re writing a hundred papers a year and it just gets to the point where either you get good at it or you don’t.”

And then he found blogging. The freedom it offered him to express whatever was on his mind was a nice break from the rigidity of essays.

In 2006, Dave, who only recently became engaged, took blogging with him to France where he went to play professional hockey for Lyon H.C.

“That was one of the things I wrote [about]; I was writing about my experience. I was away from everyone I knew … and I was just alone with a computer and I wanted to tell people what was going on and I just wrote.”

To play hockey at the professional level, he said, was one of his greatest accomplishments.

“I always wanted to play pro hockey. It’s not something that everybody gets to say [they did].”

After that season he went home to Kelowna, British Columbia, where the transition from sport to a regular job wasn’t easy.

“It’s tough when you’ve spent your life pursuing a dream and … [it’s] the only thing that matters and then you’re doing something that couldn’t matter less. You’re working for a paycheck, you’re working to get by. And it’s awful.”

Since he hung up his skates, writing has been a way for Dave to stay in touch with the game he loves. He is still just as invested he said, it’s just from a different perspective.

And though it may not seem like it at first, for Dave there are two main similarities between writing and hockey — passion and practice.

“When you latch on to a story that you love, your best comes out. It’s not that different from the game of hockey. When you’re tuned into the game, you’ve trained, you’ve practiced, you’ve done a million pushups, you’ve done a million wind sprints, you‘ve done everything because you want to be the best at the game.”

The same is true with writing.

“If you half-ass a story it’s going to show up pretty quick,” he said.

The first story Dave wrote (and was paid for) for the Kelowna Daily Courier shows where these two disciplines intersect.

He visited a Kelowna Rockets practice and saw the players in line, just stick handling. “It was just like a hockey school,” he said. Just the basic back and forth from foot to foot.

And for Dave that was the hook for his story. These players, who were one step below the NHL, were doing drills for children just learning the game and he wanted to show that the game doesn’t change much from minor to professional hockey.

“And it’s not that different from writing,” he said. “The best writers probably write every day, probably two or three times a day, or more. We put this crazy interpretation or perception on professionals of any genre that they’re doing these mystical things that normal people can’t do and at the end of the day they just have been doing them consistently, and long enough, to be in really good practice to do them well.”

Along with The Weekly, Dave writes as a contributor for the Kelowna Daily Courier, BetOnHockey.com, and The Score’s Backhand Shelf. For these publications he’s interviewed some pretty big names in the hockey world like Pat Quinn and Mark Recchi. But to Dave, “I like to think every interview is my biggest one. You never know what you’re going to hear, you never know what you get to write, and you never know who is going to read what you get to write.”

Impressively, from Jeju’s shores he is writing once a month for the Kelowna Daily Courier.

For Dave and his wife, Karma, this has been their second foray to Korea to teach English. They were originally in Geoje Island, near the mainland. They left for a year and came to Jeju this past March, and so far it seems to be agreeing with him.

“I want to keep writing. I want to keep training. I want to keep doing the things I love. I want to keep doing the things I’m passionate about. If there’s an opportunity to keep doing that on Jeju then yeah we very well might stay longer. Like I said this place is beautiful. Jeju has so many things to offer for my wife and myself; everybody really.”

Koreans do a poor Chinese impression: The Acupuncture Story.

August 4, 2009 8 comments

(orginally posted February 9th, 2009)

So, my right ankle is not that well off from fracturing my growth plate in grade 9 after coming down from a spike in a volleyball game onto John Herron’s foot. Also, I (speculatively) inherited my grandmother’s ankles, who was just recently told by her doctor that her ankle was worn out and couldn’t be fixed. All that to say, sometime this past summer (2008) I was playing on my rec-league once-a-month Korean soccer team, and I turned my ankle pretty good. It was in rough shape, but I managed to walk it off, and finish the game. The next day it had doubled in size and tripled in colors.

I showed to our school’s director, who offered to take me to the hospital. Now, from experience, this is generally nothing more than a job for Rest Ice Compression Elevation (RICE, if you will); nothing I haven’t encountered plenty of times before. But I figured, whatever, maybe get an x-ray just in case, see what’s going on in there. So off we went the next day to what turned out not to be a hospital at all. In the car, I was informed that I was now being taken to a Chinese Acupuncture clinic. Suprisingly, I didn’t have a problem with this, as I was now picturing extremely relaxed people lying face down in bed at a spa with a bunch of needles in their back, and all the combined surface area pain overloading the brain’s pain sensors, and cancelling itself out. I thought, ok, maybe this could be alright, lets see how they roll over here, maybe they know something North Americans don’t about healing. It was only a few bucks anyways, and I had always been intrigued by acupuncture.  I truly had no idea what I had got myself into.  

I was ushered into the little consultation room to have some sort of assessment that I didn’t understand because it was all being spoken in Korean. Next I was instructed to head to the next, smaller room, and sit on the table dressed in the butcher paper. After some more Korean conversation, things got underway in a hurry. The doctor grabbed my left hand (I remind you, the injury was my right ankle), and promptly inserted a 2-3″ needle into my flesh, right around my scaphoid (where your thumb meets your hand), twisted it around, told me, in my best translation, to “chill.” He then trodded off on his doctorly way. So there I am, by myself, with a huge needle in my hand, not moving because I’m frightened of stabbing my inner hand somewhere, and absorbing all the pain possible that comes with having ONE needle jammed into you, rather than the above mentioned multiples, and also chuckling a little to myself over the complete absurdity of what was happening to me. You can imagine what was going through my mind. Also, the doctor did come back occasionally to twist and turn the needle to and fro, and to send it in deeper, while I sent my incisors deeper into my right knuckles. Did I mention my RIGHT ankle was hurt, and there was a needle in my LEFT….THUMB??!!?? Eventually, 10 or 15 minutes passed, and the doc removed the needle, which seemed to have ended up about 4-5″ in there now. I thought the insanity was over. I was wrong.

I was then told through translation to lie down and the doctor grabbed my actual ankle. I thought, ok, he’s actually going to do something directly to it now. I was right. Moments later, a device surfaced that I can only describe as a stabbing gun. It was a glue gun shape, and there was one, or maybe seven needles sticking out of the end. My wonder had very little time to evolve to fear as my swollen ankle was promptly STABBED approximately 20 times in 10 seconds with said puncturing device. I’m going to need stitches in my knuckles at this point. There was so much shock running through me that I was seriously laughing at how comical it was was, perhaps a defence mechanism against the pain. After the aerating of my ankle was complete, they wheeled in another device; this time a vaccuum-sucker-pump of sorts (these are all technical medical terms I don’t expect you to be familiar with), which is then applied to my wounds, and the blood, now leaking from the holes, was sucked out for a few minutes. They eventually took it off me and told me to stand up, and that they were finished. They asked me how I felt, and I said, “Good,” only in hopes of concluding the visit. I made my way to the front counter to sign something, and they said, “Ok, see you tomorrow!” Well, my mouth said yes, but my mind broke out in hysterics. I grabbed a candy from the dish, and got out of there, as quick as conditions were allowing me. I did not go back the next day.

Also, on the topic of the title, Koreans make bad chinese food.

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